PERFOMANCE HISTORY
PERFOMANCE HISTORY
Design expressily for the Gifford Youth Orchestra by XXX

THE TIGER: 

THE GIFFORD YOUTH ORCHESTRA MASCOT

 

The tiger is the most feared animal in the wild. Even lions don't mess with tigers! This may be the reason Tigers were chosen as the mascot for Gifford High School. Before integration, that school had been center of attention in Gifford, Florida from its beginning to 1965. We haven't been able to establish the reason for that choice, but when this Youth Orchestra was being developed by the Crystal Foundation: Gifford Chapter, we decided to take on the Tigers as its mascot for all its programs. Out intention was to follow in the footsteps of continue the community pride and respect for Tigers at Gifford High School.

 

Following are the Tiger qualities as they are exhibited by the animal and as we would like to see them personified in our students. On this page, that personification is directed toward the violinists in The Gifford Youth Orchestra.

 

Tigers: They all have their own personalities

Gifford Tigers: They all have their own personalities.

 

 

Tigers: The trainer says, "I can't do the same thing with all the tigers. Some respond to certain ways of being trained and others let me know they don't like that approach. I have to know how to work with each of them individually because they all have their own personalities.

 

Gifford Tigers: Joan Haar, the Music director says, "Skittles work for all the violinists when it comes to rewards, but each violinist is inspired by different motivations."

 

 

Tigers: In the wild, Tigers rule their domain. They are so strong; they don't concern themselves with other animals, or worry about other animals doing harm to them.

 

Gifford Tigers: They are responsible for their own domain. They are responsible for learning their own parts. They are responsible for the care of their instrument. They are responsible for good behavior at home, at school, and at practice. All of this is their domain. They don't worry about other musicians doing harm to them.

 

 

Tigers: In the wild, they just lay back and then when a meal comes along, they spring into action.

 

Gifford Tigers: They practice their art so well that when an opportunity to perform comes along, they can easily spring into action.

 

 

Tigers: Their only real fear comes from being sought after for their skin, bones, and organs. They have to be very careful of humans.

 

Gifford Tigers: They have to be very careful of humans too, so they follow their parent's teachings, stick together, protect each other, and help each other at all times to insure each others safety and well being.

 

 

Tigers: They need big territories. They have to make sure other tigers don't wander into what they establish, so they have to constantly monitor their territory and patrol it. They pee on trees, rub up against trees, and scratch on the bark to leave their scent behind so other tigers know that area belongs to another them.

 

Gifford Tigers: They don't pee on trees, scratch or write on the walls, or leave their food and drinks on the floor or on the tables. But they Gifford tigers do mark their territory by cleaning up after themselves and leaving their area in better condition than it was when they first started to use the space.  However, they also have to constantly monitor their territory and patrol it, including what they do, what they think, and how they react to their feelings.

 

 

Tigers: In the wild, tigers are usually loners. They know they have to learn how to live together and respect each other. They know that if they take something from another tiger, they can expect a fight. A fight is a terrible thing for a tiger. Injuries from fighting can cause them a lifetime of suffering, or even end their lives, prematurely. So they use their smarts to figure out how to live together without fighting.

 

Gifford Tigers: They do the same. Instead, Gifford Tigers are encouraged to figure out ways to learn their part so well that they can play in harmony, not only with other tigers but other Animals and musicians, as well!

 

 

Tigers: In the wild they try to avoid the fight. The tiger knows that its body is essential. It can't afford to fight. Parts of their body can become injured or damaged. Tigers go to great lengths to avoid a fight to preserve their health. They know they need their hands to grab the food and their feet to run, so they don't jeopardize their bodies by fighting.

 

Gifford Tigers: They do the same. They know that fighting can be a reason they have to leave the orchestra. They know how important their hands and fingers are for playing their instruments, and how important it is to practice good health to preserve their bodies. Especially eating good food and DRINKING PLENTY WATER!

 

 

 

Tigers: While they are tiger cubs, they are constantly playing.  Their play is for more than just fun and games. Their play is to learn life long skills. While they are playing, they practice all their fighting abilities: stalking, catching, loud growling, etc. At a seeming young age they have to venture off by themselves and have to take care of themselves, which they can do if they have practiced all their survival skills while they were little.

 

Gifford Tigers: Learn to perform and tutor so they can use their skills to perform and teach others, and consequently be able to take care of themselves when they are older. They learn that they can put food on their table by teaching and performing, if they practice their art, all the time! Something a Gifford Tiger can do that a Tiger in the world can't do is play Video Games! Gifford Tigers sometimes play video games to improve their motor coordination between fingers, mind, and body! It is most important for Gifford Tigers to learn their notes so when they see that note, they know exactly which string to use and which hand and finger position they need. 

 

 

The above characteristics of tigers is based on an interview by
Crystal Bujol of Jeff Harwell, Trainer for Out of Africa, Rimrock,
Arizona, June 2009

 




The tiger is the most feared animal in the wild. Even lions don't mess with tigers! This may be the reason Tigers were chosen as the mascot for Gifford High School. Before integration, that school had been center of attention in Gifford, Florida from its beginning to 1965. We haven't been able to establish the reason for that choice, but when this Youth Orchestra was being developed by the Crystal Foundation: Gifford Chapter, we decided to take on the Tigers as its mascot for all its programs. Our intention was to follow in the footsteps of continue the community pride and respect for Tigers at Gifford High School.



Following are the Tiger qualities as they are exhibited by the animal and as we would like to see them personified in our students. On this page, that personification is directed toward the violinists in The Gifford Youth Orchestra.



Tigers: They all have their own personalities



Gifford Tigers: They all have their own personalities.





Tigers: The trainer says, "I can't do the same thing with all the tigers. Some respond to certain ways of being trained and others let me know they don't like that approach. I have to know how to work with each of them individually because they all have their own personalities.



Gifford Tigers: Joan Haar, the Music director says, "Skittles work for all the violinists when it comes to rewards, but each violinist is inspired by different motivations."





Tigers: In the wild, Tigers rule their domain. They are so strong; they don't concern themselves with other animals, or worry about other animals doing harm to them.



Gifford Tigers: They are responsible for their own domain. They are responsible for learning their own parts. They are responsible for the care of their instrument. They are responsible for good behavior at home, at school, and at practice. All of this is their domain. They don't worry about other musicians doing harm to them.





Tigers: In the wild, they just lay back and then when a meal comes along, they spring into action.



Gifford Tigers: They practice their art so well that when an opportunity to perform comes along, they can easily spring into action.



Tigers: Their only real fear comes from being sought after for their skin, bones, and organs. They have to be very careful of humans.



Gifford Tigers: They have to be very careful of humans too, so they follow their parent's teachings, stick together, protect each other, and help each other at all times to insure each others safety and well being.





Tigers: They need big territories. They have to make sure other tigers don't wander into what they establish, so they have to constantly monitor their territory and patrol it. They pee on trees, rub up against trees, and scratch on the bark to leave their scent behind so other tigers know that area belongs to another them.



Gifford Tigers: They don't pee on trees, scratch or write on the walls, or leave their food and drinks on the floor or on the tables. But they Gifford tigers do mark their territory by cleaning up after themselves and leaving their area in better condition than it was when they first started to use the space. However, they also have to constantly monitor their territory and patrol it, including what they do, what they think, and how they react to their feelings.





Tigers: In the wild, tigers are usually loners. They know they have to learn how to live together and respect each other. They know that if they take something from another tiger, they can expect a fight. A fight is a terrible thing for a tiger. Injuries from fighting can cause them a lifetime of suffering, or even end their lives, prematurely. So they use their smarts to figure out how to live together without fighting.



Gifford Tigers: They do the same. Instead, Gifford Tigers are encouraged to figure out ways to learn their part so well that they can play in harmony, not only with other tigers but other Animals and musicians, as well!





Tigers: In the wild they try to avoid the fight. The tiger knows that its body is essential. It can't afford to fight. Parts of their body can become injured or damaged. Tigers go to great lengths to avoid a fight to preserve their health. They know they need their hands to grab the food and their feet to run, so they don't jeopardize their bodies by fighting.



Gifford Tigers: They do the same. They know that fighting can be a reason they have to leave the orchestra. They know how important their hands and fingers are for playing their instruments, and how important it is to practice good health to preserve their bodies. Especially eating good food and DRINKING PLENTY WATER!





Tigers: While they are tiger cubs, they are constantly playing. Their play is for more than just fun and games. Their play is to learn life-long skills. While they are playing, they practice all their fighting abilities: stalking, catching, loud growling, etc. At a seeming young age they have to venture off by themselves and have to take care of themselves, which they can do if they have practiced all their survival skills while they were little.



Gifford Tigers: Learn to perform and tutor so they can use their skills to perform and teach others, and consequently be able to take care of themselves when they are older. They learn that they can put food on their table by teaching and performing, if they practice their art, all the time! Something a Gifford Tiger can do that a Tiger in the world can't do is playing Video Games! Gifford Tigers sometimes play video games to improve their motor coordination between fingers, mind, and body! It is most important for Gifford Tigers to learn their notes so when they see that note, they know exactly which string to use and which hand and finger position they need.





The above characteristics of tigers is based on an interview by

Crystal Bujol of Jeff Harwell, Trainer for Out of Africa, Rimrock,

Arizona, June 2009

 

 





Contact Us

The Gifford Florida Youth Orchestra
8 Vista Gardens Trl #102
Vero Beach, FL 32962

 

 Mailing Address:P O Box 691166

Vero Beach, FL 32969-1166
Phone: +1 772 / 778-5118

 

Email: GYO@GYOTIGERS.ORG

Upcoming Dates

November 5, 2016

"The Magic of 13 Years"

ANNUAL CONCERT  2:00 p.m.

The Gifford Community Center 

            4855 43rd Avenue

  Corner 43rd Ave. & 49th St.   

 

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